Recent Water Damage Posts

Our Thorough Water Damage Inspection Process | SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties

5/7/2020 (Permalink)

Water damage in the corner of a home When dealing with water damage, immediate action is crucial. Contact SERVPRO of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties for prompt & dependable service.

When you call us for water damage, you can be certain that you will receive a complete water restoration process that addresses all possible points of damage. One of the ways that we ensure this is by doing a complete and thorough inspection during our water damage restoration process.

Once you get in touch with us, our highly trained technicians will respond quickly and do a full inspection to create a water damage restoration plan. Here’s how it works:

  1. Identify and Stop Continuing Water Flow

If the water is due to something such as a broken pipe or plumbing issue, it is possible that moisture may still be seeping into the area undetected. We will do a complete assessment to determine if there is still an active flow of water due to a leak and if so, we will stop it to prevent any further damage from occurring.

  1. Define the Classification of Water

Understanding the categorical classification of the water damage will help us determine the severity and how to proceed with the repairs. There are three types of water damage categories that are possible when damage is present.

  • Category 1 Water consists of clean water that is not contaminated.
  • Category 2 Water is contaminated with chemical or biological byproducts, which can be common after dishwashers or sump pumps overflow.
  • Category 3 Water is severely contaminated, often caused by floods or sewage overflows, and can cause serious health issues.
  1. Inspect the Area and Determine the Extent of the Damage

Water damage can be especially tricky because it can impact areas that are not immediately visible to the naked eye. Moisture can seep into drywall and impact the structure of the home, which can also affect adjacent rooms that were not touched by flooding. We will do a full inspection to determine just how far-reaching the damage is so you can have a full and complete restoration that leaves no affected area untreated.

If you have had water damage to your home, you can count on us to help you recover. Contact us at any hour to set our water damage restoration plan in motion.

Winter Weather Worries

4/16/2020 (Permalink)

Winter weather can bring about more issues than just slippery roads and a sidewalk to shovel. If you live where temperatures sink below freezing level, you are also at risk for frozen pipes and ice dams, which can create a major disaster at your home or property.

FROZEN PIPES

Frozen pipes are often those exposed to the cold weather, such as those outside your house, or in cold areas such as basements, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets.

A frozen pipe can burst at the point where the ice blockage inside the pipe is located, but typically the rupture is caused by the backflow pressure between the water source and the blockage. A burst pipe can cause considerable damage to your property if not addressed quickly.

To prevent pipes from freezing, here are a few steps you can take, according to The American Red Cross:

  • Be sure to completely drain water from swimming pool and sprinkler lines, as well as outside hoses.
  • Open kitchen cabinets to let warm air circulate near the plumbing.
  • When the weather is extremely cold, let water drip from faucets that may come from exposed pipes.
  • Keep your heat set to the same temperature both day and night.

ICE DAMS

Ice dams can be a little-known, but major problem during the snowy season. They form when heated air melts roof snow downward into water dammed behind still-frozen ice. When the trapped water cannot safely flow or run into the gutter system, it can backflow under the roof ’s shingles and into the structure’s interior areas, as well as causing gutters and shingles to move or fall.

Icicles can be an initial sign of an ice dam, according to Travelers.com. To spot ice dams inside, “check for water stains or moisture in your attic or along the ceiling of exterior walls of your house. Water stains or moisture may be an indication that an ice dam has formed and water has penetrated the roof membrane.”

Removing an ice dam as soon as it is found is vital to helping prevent damage to your property and can be done using heated cables, a roof shovel, or calcium chloride ice melter.

If winter weather causes water damage to you or your insured’s property, the professionals at SERVPRO® of Conyers/Covington are only a call away, 24/7, ready to restore to preloss condition.

Source: redcross.orgTravelers.com

Courtesy of Restoration Newsline Vol 30, Iss 1

Tips for Cleaning Your Home After Water Damage

4/15/2020 (Permalink)

Water in unwanted places can cause a lot of damage. Not only can it ruin your prized possessions, but also the house in which they are stored. If you’re able to act quickly, you can minimize the damage and possibly save some of your possessions. Some of your success depends on how long the water’s been around, there might be pieces of furniture that can be saved, and sometimes, even carpet, but any electronics hit by water are probably doomed.

Don’t treat flood water in unwanted places lightly: even if your basement only has an inch of water in it, or is even just damp, it is the perfect breeding ground for mold. Mold growth not only ruins walls, furniture, carpets, flooring, etc., it can lead to poor indoor air quality causing respiratory problems including asthma, and can lead to severe illness. So in addition to calling your insurance company, here are a few tips to deal with your flooded basement and minimize the water damage. (Call your insurance company before you do anything, and tell them what you want to do.)

  1. Disconnect the power, unplug any electronics, and remove electronics, furniture and movable items immediately. The faster you get items out of water’s way, the more likely you’ll be able to save them. Definitely move all electrical items first, and if you can, turn off your power leading into the affected area, especially if water rises above electrical outlets. Pull up any carpets (wall to wall and area rugs) and underpadding. You may be able to save the carpet if you get it cleaned and disinfected, however, it may shrink and be better off as an area rug afterwards. It’s unlikely you’ll be able to save the underpadding, which acts like a sponge and absorbs a lot of water.
  2. Get rid of the water. There are several ways to get rid of the water. If you don’t have power, or are worried about loose wires, the old-fashioned, manual way will work. Use old towels, buckets and mops to soak up as much water as possible. As long as sewers in your neighborhood aren’t backed up, you can pour the water down the drain, otherwise, pour onto your lawn or other permeable surface. A wet/dry vacuum can be used too, note: be very careful to plug it into outlets far away from water. Don’t use an extension cord as the connection could also short out and give you a nasty shock. Water and electricity don’t mix! If your basement or other flooded area is overwhelming and you have power, consider renting (if available) a sump pump from your local Rent-all or hardware stores. Getting rid of all the water and drying out the area is the most important thing you can do to prevent mold growth. 
  3. Dry out the affected area. Once you’ve mopped up all the water, use fans and  a dehumidifier to help dry out the area. If it’s stopped raining, open windows to allow for air circulation and faster drying. You want to dry the area out as soon as possible. If you have a finished basement and the drywall was affected, you’ll probably have to cut away the areas that were touched by water as the drywall will crumble and the paper backing is a good source of food for mold. If you have baseboard trim, take it up first, and if it’s made from pressboard it will likely not be salvageable. If it was wood, you might be able to save it.
  4. Disinfect. After the area has dried out, including wood beams, insulation, drywall, etc., use a good disinfectant to get rid of any bacteria that might have come up through sewers, toilets, etc. Disinfect all areas affected by the flood waters including walls and wood and non-upholstered furniture that sat in flood water.
  5. Dispose of damaged items responsibly: you’ll be tempted to throw everything into a dumpster and send it all away and out of site. But if you can organize damaged goods into piles and take what you can to recycling centres, you will help alleviate the pressure on your local landfill site. Go to your city or town’s waste management website to find out where to recycle old paints, stains, adhesives and other toxic liquids, any damaged electronics from cell phones to TVs and computers, furniture, and even drywall. You can also look through Earth 911 to find recycling centres in your neighborhood.

*Courtesy of https://www.concrobium.com/blog/2012/11/07/tips-for-cleaning-your-home-after-water-damage/

Sources of Exterior Water Damage

4/6/2020 (Permalink)

There are many ways that water can infiltrate your home, often when you least expect it. It will destroy everything in its path and take over your entire world. In addition to increased stress levels, unexpected water damage can cause displacement for you and your family. Only a certified and insured restoration company should be trusted to mitigate the damage to your home. SERVPRO of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties is your local resource to get your home back in working order.

Water damage can occur from both interior and exterior sources. Below are some ways you can help prevent water damage inside your home that comes from outside sources.

Roof

  • Ensure that shingles, flashings or tiles on your roof aren’t missing, broken, cracked, curled or damaged in other ways.
  • Cut tree limbs that hang above your roof so they don’t cling to shingles and trap moisture.
  • Make sure the vents, flues, chimneys, air conditioners, and evaporative coolers are properly installed and in good shape.
  • Check for leaks around rooftop air-conditioning units, vents for exhaust or plumbing, or other specialized equipment.

Gutters and Downspouts

  • Clear gutters and downspouts from leaves, twigs, and other debris. Also check that they are in good condition so that water can flow freely. You can do this by installing metal screens to help prevent clogging.
  • Ensure downspouts direct water at least five feet away from your home’s foundation. This helps direct water away from the foundation. Downspout extensions can be added if needed.

Doors and Windows

  • Install window well covers to help prevent water and debris from getting trapped and causing water to eventually seep into your basement.
  • Check for leaks near the corners of your doors and windows. Signs of leaks include peeling paint, paint discoloration or swollen frames.
  • Installing overhangs or awnings above exterior doors and windows protects them from the sun, rain, and snow.
  • Check for a tight fit on closed doors and windows. Any cracks between the sash and frame Close your doors and windows to check for a tight fit. Repair or replace damaged flashing or weather-stripping.

Walls

  • Check for and repair cracked or broken siding boards, bricks, stone or another masonry, and structural sheathing.
  • Remove any shrubs and other landscaping features from along the walls, and avoid directing water towards the house when irrigating the garden and plants to prevent excessive water near the foundation.
  • Seal any openings from wiring, plumbing, phone, cable, and heating and air conditioning lines with foam or caulk. Repair any damaged or unpainted wood surrounding these openings.
  • Termites can eat wood, plaster, and even metal siding causing holes and compromising structural integrity. Check for signs of termite activity on the walls and the wooden structures around your foundation.
  • Ensure that the exhaust vent doors properly open and close.

Following these steps can help protect your home from exterior water damage. If water does happen to sneak into your home, make sure to have SERVPRO of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties on speed dial. We’ll be there to make it “Like it never even happened.”

Do You Know What to do When a Flood Happens?

4/1/2020 (Permalink)

Floods are one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States. Whether your home or business is near a coastline, along city streets, in the mountains, near a river, or even in the desert—there is always potential for flood damage. Fema.gov reports in the last 5 years, all 50 states have experienced floods or flash floods. Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past does not mean you won’t in the future. In fact, nearly 20% of all flood insurance claims come from moderate-to-low risk areas, and even just one inch of flood damage in an average home can cost you up to $27,000.*

According to the American Red Cross, floods cause more damage in the U.S. every year than any other weather related disaster. The American Red Cross offers the following flood safety tips.

  • Stay away from floodwaters. If you come up on a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around, and go another way. Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet.
  • If you approach a flooded road while driving, turn around and go another way. If you are caught on a flooded road and waters are rising rapidly around you, get out of the car quickly and move to higher ground. Most cars can be swept away by less than two feet of moving water.
  • Keep children out of the water. They are curious and often lack judgment about running water or contaminated water.

If a flood does strike your home or business, contact SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties at 770-483-1212. Even minor floods have the potential to cause major damage to a structure when not treated quickly and properly, and the cleanup is often an overwhelming task. The SERVPRO® System is prepared to handle any sized disaster. When fire and water take control of your life, SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties will help you take it back.

*Facts and figures provided by fema.gov

**Courtesy of Restoration Newsline Vol 29, Iss 3

When Water Damage Strikes

4/1/2020 (Permalink)

The first 24 hours following a water loss are the most important in preventing secondary or permanent damage. Within four hours of loss notification, SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties will be on-site to help ensure a water damage is handled by completing the following steps.

INSPECTION

SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties will inspect affected areas to determine the extent of water damage and will review the inspection with you to answer any questions before beginning any work.

EMERGENCY SERVICES

SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties will take steps to help protect your home or business, as well as personal belongings and other contents, from further damage by extracting the excess water and preparing the area for drying. They will explain the needed emergency services to you step-by-step.

MONITORING

To help ensure your home or business and belongings are dried to appropriate industry standards, SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties will monitor the drying process. The updates will be consistently communicated to you.

RESTORATION SERVICES

SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties' team of professionals will repair structural materials, reinstall carpets, and clean affected areas of your property and belongings. A final walk-through of the job-site will be conducted with you to help ensure the property was returned to preloss condition.

EMERGENCY WATER DAMAGE TIPS

  • Shut off the water source if possible or contact a qualified party to stop the water source.
  • Turn off circuit breakers for wet areas of the building when access to the power distribution panel is safe from electrical shock.
  • Remove as much excess water as possible by mopping and blotting.
  • Place aluminium foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Move any paintings, art objects, computers, documents, and other sensitive valuables to a dry place.
  • Don’t enter affected areas if electrical outlets, switches, circuit breakers, or electrical equipment are exposed to water. Always avoid electrical shock hazards.
  • Don’t use your household vacuum cleaner to remove water; this could cause electrical shock or damage to the vacuum cleaner.
  • Don’t turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet or enter rooms where ceilings are sagging from retained water.

For more information on recovering from water damage, contact SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties today - 770-716-3595.

*Courtesy of Restoration Newsline Vol 29, Iss 3

Flooding Can Happen Anywhere

3/16/2020 (Permalink)

According to the National Weather Service (NOAA), “Approximately seventy-five percent of all Presidential disaster declarations are associated with flooding.” NOAA lists the most common flood hazards in the United States as:

• Flash Flooding

• River Flooding

• Storm Surge and Coastal Inundation from Tropical and Non-Tropical Systems

• Burn Scars/Debris Flows (Caused by Wildfires)

• Ice/Debris Jams

• Snowmelt

• Dry Wash (Caused by heavy rainfall in dry areas)

• Dam Breaks/Levee Failure

Just because you haven’t experienced a flood doesn’t mean you won’t in the future. In fact, 20% of all claims paid by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) were for policies in low-risk communities. On average, floods cost $3.5 billion in annual losses in the U.S., and commercial flood claims average more than $75,000 (NFIP).

When catastrophic water damage happens to you, SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties can help. They can help you prepare ahead of time with an Emergency Ready Profile® (ERP), or respond to any size disaster to begin cleanup and restoration to get you back in business as soon as possible. SERVPRO® of Fayette/S. Fulton Counties is ready to help make it “Like it never even happened.”

*Courtesy of Restoration Newsline Vol 30, Iss 3

THE SCIENCE OF DRYING

8/5/2019 (Permalink)

Did you know there is actually a science behind the process of drying? Having the knowledge of psychrometrics is essential to restoring a water damaged structure to its preloss condition. While your initial reaction may be to grab a few towels to mop up the mess and place a fan or two around the damaged area, your local SERVPRO® Franchise Professionals are trained in the science of drying and follow strict industry-approved standards to help lower the chances of any secondary damages. If your business suffers a water damage, your local SERVPRO® Franchise Professionals will: • Inspect the building to detect every component that is wet to help prevent secondary damage from happening. • Measure how much moisture is in wet materials and monitor whether the materials are drying properly. • Speed up Mother Nature by using professional drying equipment. What exactly does it mean to help “speed up Mother Nature”? A wet building can often dry naturally because the environment always seeks equilibrium. When materials are wet, moisture will naturally move to drier air at the surface of the material—but only if the air is drier.

The only problem is, nature often takes too long and secondary damages may occur while the building is drying out.

Your local SERVPRO® Franchise Professionals have the tools and equipment to help Mother Nature along, including equipment to help dry hardwood floors, tough-to-reach spaces inside walls, and much more. Your local SERVPRO® Franchise Professionals also use state-of-the-art monitoring equipment and a proven scientific process to help speed the drying of your home or business.

It’s not only the equipment but the technology too! SERVPRO® has developed DryBook™, a proprietary tool that provides realtime documentation and updates on the drying process and helps ensure industry drying requirements are met. With DryBook™ Mobile, you have the ability to know exactly where your property is in the drying process.

The bottom line? Your local SERVPRO® has the professional training and equipment to help make water damage “Like it never even happened.”

*Courtesy of: RESTORATION NEWSLINE

Volume 30 Issue 8